Jess Hurd

Photographer
Posts Tagged ‘I’m a Photographer Not a Terrorist’

My Life As A Domestic Extremist

jj1406a49First published on the TUC ToUChstone Blog
Six members of the National Union of Journalists have launched a legal challenge to have their data removed from a police ‘domestic extremist’ database and stop the state surveillance of journalists and trade unionists.I’m a freelance photographer and my colleagues in the legal challenge with me include Times journalist Jules Mattsson, freelance video-journalist Jason N. Parkinson and freelance photographers Adrian Arbib and David Hoffman. We have joined with campaigning journalist and comedian Mark Thomas, to oppose the targeted surveillance and intimidation we have faced during policing operations in a Bhatt Murphy led legal challenge.After several years of complaints we launched a campaign group I’m a Photographer Not a Terrorist with NUJ-funded films Collateral Damage and Hostile Reconnaissance which exposed what was happening on the ground, including increased violence towards the press. The routine abuse of s44 Terrorism Act stop and search powers was made unlawful after a vibrant, photographer led campaign and a European Court challenge.

This secret state surveillance has been going on for a long time but now we get the chance to examine our files via Subject Access Data Protection (DPA) requests we find that nearly 15 years of information has been logged (of the information that they have allowed us to see), from ridiculous notes identifying me as always wearing ‘Joe 90-style’ spectacles, to more sinister records about our involvement in trade union activities, sexual orientation and even a family member’s medical history.

We are all accredited journalists yet we find ourselves sharing a police database with other, mostly unknowing UK citizens who have had information gathered on them in the apparent interests of policing an ill-defined and opaque concept: ‘domestic extremism’.

It is hard to see how this can be about policing domestic extremism – it appears to be about criminalising dissent and those who would document it. From Orgreave through to Occupy, the right to democratically protest, and the right to report upon it, is being eroded. Our access to justice via legal aid is being cut and the journalists who shine a light on the crimes of the state and corporations are being targeted. It is not just about intimidation and surveillance – it is about the sinister way information can be shared and impact on our lives as we have seen with corporate blacklisting.

I am proud to stand alongside my NUJ colleagues in this legal challenge which aims to hold the police and Home Secretary to account for their activities. We welcome support from the labour movement in our demand to end the state surveillance of journalists and all those lawfully exercising their democratic and human rights.

Frances O’Grady is supporting the campaign and recently spoke at an NUJ event about mass surveillance. She said:

“There is growing concern that the authorities are using surveillance against union members, journalists and campaigners. Political policing has no place in a democratic society, it threatens press freedom and any unjustified conduct must stop.”

 

How to find out if you are a Domestic Extremist
News Coverage
National Union of Journalists press release – including full statements
Guardian: Police Face Legal Action For Snooping on Journalists
Associated Press: UK Police Spied on Reporters For Years
Independent: Comedian Mark Thomas to Sue Met Police Over Snooping
BBC: Journalists Demand Police Destroy Surveillance Files
The Times: Journalists Take Police To Court Over secret Data
Press Gazette: Six Journalists Sue Met Police Over Surveillance…
Belfast Telegraph: Journalsits Sue “Snooping” Police
Comment
Press Gazette: Jules Mattsson – My Files Include Sexual Orientation & Family Medical History
Guardian: Jason N. Parkinson: When Police Spy on Journalists Like Me

Redacted – excerpts from the Domestic Extremist Database

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Jess Hurd and Jason N. Parkinson with their work – ‘Redacted’ – We Could Not Agree, Q Park, Cavendish Square. London. © Tracey Moberly

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‘Redacted’ – a collaborative work by Jess Hurd and Jason N. Parkinson exhibited at We Could Not Agree, Q Park, Cavendish Square. London.

Redacted – excerpts from the Domestic Extremist Database

– a collaborative work by photojournalist Jess Hurd & her partner in crime, video-journalist Jason N. Parkinson shown publicly for the first time at the We Could Not Agree exhibition Q Park, Cavendish Square.

Jason Parkinson and Jess Hurd are well respected, professional, NUJ accredited journalists yet they find themselves sharing a police database with other, mostly unknowing UK citizens who have had information gathered on them in the interest of ‘national security’.

These include activists, journalists, comedians, politicians and other ‘subversives’.

This sinister, secret state surveillance has been going on a long time, but now we get the chance to examine our files, well the sections that the police allow us to look at – we suspect large swathes are redacted.

Often people say “if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear”, but what if inaccurate, subjective, bias builds up a profile of you that is shared with other agencies, you are targeted whilst working, singled out, even blacklisted and assaulted.

This has happened and will continue to happen unless it is challenged.

Secret police, covert surveillance, secret courts, we are not creeping towards a police state, we have arrived.

© Jess Hurd/Jason N. Parkinson

Image with the kind permission of artist/curator Tracey Moberly

We Could Not Agree – Exhibition Invite

 

Next week sees the opening of We Could Not Agree

Myself and video journalist Jason N. Parkinson are exhibiting a piece called:

 REDACTED – excerpts from the Domestic Extremist Database – (UPDATE)

– a collaborative work of previously unseen content from our secret police files.

Please do come along!

Thanks to our fabulous friend, artist/photographer Tracey Moberly who is one of the shows curators.

 

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Phnat en las Barricadas

Photographer Oscar Pinal on the miners barricades in La Robla, wearing fantastic Phnat merchandise. Northern Spain.

© Jess Hurd/reportdigital.co.uk

 

 

Flashmob City Hall

Flashmob City Hall

22 April 2011

Tuesday 3rd May, World Press Freedom Day, at City Hall, London SE1 2AA at 12:30.

I’m a Photographer, Not a Terrorist! (PHNAT), the campaign group set up to fight unnecessary and draconian restrictions against individuals taking photographs in public spaces, is organising a flashmob outside London’s City Hall.

The event takes place on International Press Freedom Day and is supported by the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) London Photographers’ Branch (LPB).

PHNAT is concerned about the role of private security guards in the prevention of terrorism. Their role has been promoted by police, with the result that many privately employed guards are illegally preventing citizens from taking any photographs at all.

Areas designated as public realm are often privately managed spaces that are subject to rules laid down by the private management companies. Most insidious of these is the outright banning of photography in some of our most widely enjoyed public spaces, such as Canary Wharf and the Thames Walk between Tower Bridge and City Hall.

The mass gathering will highlight the restrictions on street photography in a public space. Photographers are encouraged to bring a tripod.

An illustrated PHNAT pamphlet will also be launched at the event. Created by PHNAT and LPB members, supported by the NUJ, British Press Photographers Association (BPPA) and the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom, it will celebrate the history of the PHNAT campaign.

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